Cooler Master Notepal D1

Jun 11th, 2009 | By Simon

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Setup is incredibly simple with the D1: put your notebook on top of the D1 and power the fans via USB if so desired.

cooler master d1

My 12″ Dell M1210 notebook takes up the entire surface and a larger laptop would overhang on this design, although Cooler Master states that it supports up to 15″ notebooks. With the USB extension plugged in, I didn’t particularly like how wide the cable stuck out the side. I wouldn’t mind as much if I had a USB port on the back of my laptop but with the side port there is the additional risk of someone walking by and the USB cable getting caught and pulling my notebook aside.

cooler master d1

For the past few weeks I’ve alternated between using the Cooler Master D1 and resting my notebook flat on the table. The 10 degree incline provided by the D1 certainly feels more ergonomic. My wrists feel as if they are in a more natural position. To thermally test the D1, I put it up against the Light Laptop Stand I previously reviewed and the results of leaving my notebook on the table. I also considered the situation of using the D1 without the additional 70mm fans. I achieved full load on my notebook by running Prime95 v2.56′s small FFT for one hour followed by idling the notebook for one hour. At the end of each hour I recorded the temperatures on the CPU as determined by Notebook Hardware Control as well as the CPU fan exhaust temperature monitored by a thermal probe and the temperature on the bottom side of my laptop as monitored by a second thermal probe.

Here are the results:

Full Load Temperatures

cooler master d1

Idle Temperatures

cooler master d1

There is a clear distinction between the Cooler Master D1 with fans and all the other results. The tiny bit of air moved dropped the CPU temperature by seven degrees Celsius. Without the fan, the temperatures are still much better than running the notebook flat on the desk but show limited improvements over the Light Laptop Stand. The big advantage with the D1 over the Light Laptop Stand would be the quick setup. You don’t need to fiddle with two arms and balance the notebook on the table; however the D1 is not nearly as portable as the Light Laptop Stand.

One nuisance I had with the D1 was the vibration it caused on my table. I found that the base would hum. If I lifted the D1 and my notebook up into the air, it would not make a peep. The D1 has four feet on the bottom, but I would have liked to see rubber or silicone feet to dampen the vibration. The hard plastic doesn’t do the trick for me. I found this to be an issue on both my wooden and glass desk. In the meantime I’m still using the D1 but without the fans being powered. It still provides some cooling advantage and anything to reduce the heat on my notebook is a plus in my books.

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5 comments
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  1. Thanks for the review and the pictures! You answered all the questions I had…going to order one of these now :)

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  2. Thank you for a good and detail review.

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  3. Appreciate the review! It was extremely helpful. The bar graphs did the trick for me.

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  4. Thanks for the review, very professional.

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  5. good review, but what about the fan’s noise? is it high?

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