Corsair Padlock 2

Apr 4th, 2010 | By Simon

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While Corsair shipped the Padlock 2 to me in a simple cardboard box, the retail package is only a clamshell package prominently displaying the Padlock 2 in all its glory.

Corsair Padlock 2 Corsair Padlock 2

A few key features are visible on the front of the package but clearly the intent is for you to be drawn towards the drive itself and the PINs used to secure the data. Flipping the package onto the back, Corsair has printed a short blurb about the Padlock 2 in six different languages and lists the included items in the package (USB extension cable and lanyard).

Corsair Padlock 2

A small leaflet is included to direct users on how to lock and unlock the drive. Below we can see everything included in the Padlock 2 retail package.

Corsair Padlock 2

The drive has a lot of resemblance to the Voyager family with the rubber casing. There are 6 little buttons on one face: five to select your pin and a sixth to enter the sequence to unlock the drive. Three LEDs on this face also provide indication on drive activity and whether or not the drive is unlocked or locked.

Corsair Padlock 2 Corsair Padlock 2

If you’re a perfectionist and want everything to mate smoothly, one thing to keep in mind is that the rubber cap is offset to one side and won’t line up smoothly if you have it rotated the wrong way. It’s really not an issue but something I thought I’d point out. It would have made sense to me for Corsair to make the case symmetrical.

Corsair Padlock 2 Corsair Padlock 2

Minor details aside, the body of the Padlock 2 is nothing special. It will fit in any regular USB slot but adjoining ones may be blocked due to the slightly larger size.

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  1. Nice review. I bought the 16GB version and have to say I am very happy. I wish the drive was a little faster and smaller but it’s not terribly slow and it’s the best solution for me.

    I did quite a bit of research and tested other solutions. I had my heart set on the IronKey but I found out you cannot use that drive on just any computer. A lot of public and client computers do not allow portable executables to be run from external drives. The IronKey requires you to run its built-in login executable to gain access to the drive.

    Since the Padlock2 is now encased in epoxy, I think its security is more than sufficient. I even added software encryption so I also have an encrypted container for items I really want to secure.

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