Patriot Memory 16GB Bolt USB Flash Drive

May 7th, 2010 | By Simon

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In order to test the Patriot Memory Bolt, I will be subjecting it to a few benchmarks: IOMeter, ATTO Diskbenchmark and Crystal Disk Mark. I won’t cover any installation details because it is plug and play. I’ll cover a few details about the 256-bit encryption on the next page.

Patriot Memory Bolt

    Control

  • CPU: Intel C2D Q6600 (G0 SLACR L731B434) @ 2.71GHz
  • MB: Asus P5E3-Dlx Wifi-AP Edition
  • GPU: Sapphire HD 4850 X2 Catalyst
  • RAM: Aeneon 2×2GB XTune DDR3-1600 (AXH860UD20-16H) @ 1800MHz 10-10-10-30 1T
  • PSU: Cooler Master Real Power Pro 850W
  • CPU Cooling: Thermalright HR-01 w/ 120mm Antec Tri-Cool Fan
  • PWM/NB/SB Cooling: Stock/Stock/Stock
  • HDD: Seagate Barracuda 7200.9 80GB 7200RPM 8MB Cache (ST3808110AS)
  • OS: Windows XP Pro SP3
    USB Flash Drives

  • 16GB Patriot Memory Bolt
  • 8GB Corsair Padlock 2
  • 32GB Corsair Flash Survivor GT
  • 4GB OCZ ATV Turbo

IOMeter
IOMeter is an I/O subsystem measurement and characteristic tool for single and clustered systems initially designed by Intel.

IOMeter is both a workload generator (that is, it performs I/O operations in order to stress the system) and a measurement tool (that is, it examines and records the performance of its I/O operations and their impact on the system). It can be configured to emulate the disk or network I/O load of any program or benchmark, or can be used to generate entirely synthetic I/O loads. It can generate and measure loads on single or multiple (networked) systems.

Patriot Memory Bolt

Patriot Memory Bolt

ATTO Diskbenchmark
ATTO Diskbenchmark is an old but popular benchmarking tool. It captures the read and write performance at different transfer sizes for a fixed file size.

Patriot Memory Bolt

Patriot Memory Bolt

Crystal Disk Mark
Crystal Disk Mark tests the read and write speed for a user selected file size at three different transfer rates: sequential, 512K and 4K. I selected a 1000MB test file.

Patriot Memory Bolt

For a drive with 256-bit hardware encryption, I was impressed by the overall performance. It was not as fast as my Corsair Survivor GT which offers no data security but it was faster than my recently reviewed Corsair Padlock 2. Overall the read speed reached 32MB/s which was on par with the Survivor GT and the write speed reached about 15MB/s which was a few megabytes faster than the Padlock 2 and a few megabytes slower than the GT. Regardless of whether or not the drive was in the secure or unsecure mode there was no difference in performance.

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